Longhouse Reserve Garden Tour

Located in East Hampton Township, Longhouse Reserve covers 16 acres of property. Jack Larsen has owned the property since 1970, and has turned it into a work of wonder. Every inch of this land is covered in gardens, established lawns, sculptures and artwork. Longhouse Reserve is open to the public a few times a year, showcasing all this beautiful art. Pieces include Dale Chihuly’s Cobalt Reeds, An infinity pool entitled Black Mirror by Ray Smith & Association, A cinderblock sculpture called Irregular Progression High #7 by Sol LeWitt and Study in Heightened Perspective by Jack Lenor Larsen. Study in Heightened Perspective was interesting to look at; the garden posts were deliberately shortened in height the farther in to the garden they went, creating an illusion that the path was longer then it actually was. All of the posts were created from recycled materials. Here are some photos from our day at the Reserve. 

July 26, 2017

Here is what’s currently growing around the yard, all of the colors are so wonderful. The first photo is all the plants that we bought to transfer into the ground. I love the orange lilies, the way they hang and the speckling on the petals is so interesting. We also have coleus growing inside of an old water fountain towards the back of the house. 

July 2017 Garden Events

This July there are many gardening events happening around Long Island. Here’s a list of things you can do this month and get outdoors! 

Farmers Markets – There are many farmers markets happening around the Island, click here to read our article on where you can find them! 

Tai Chi & Yoga – Throughout the Spring and Summer, at Old Westbury Gardens. For more information, click here. 

Bayard Cutting Arboretum Guided Tours – Free guided tours around the gardens every Saturday starting at 11AM. For more information, click here.

Talk and Tour at Old Westbury Gardens – Every Sunday and Wednesday throughout July, “Experience Art in the Landscape at Old Westbury Gardens.” For more information, click here.

The Lawn Expert! – Free lawn care advice in person or via email, Tuesdays through the end of October at Bridge Gardens in Bridgehampton. For more information, click here.

Botanicals with Watercolor and Colored Pencil – Thursday mornings throughout July and August, sponsored by the Peconic Land Trust. Class size is limited ($20/ class.) For more information, click here.

Visit Madoo Garden! – Open every Friday and Saturday from Noon to 4PM through September 15th. For more information, click here.

Seasonal Highlights at BBG – Throughout July, enjoy a free garden wide walk at Brooklyn Botanical Gardens. For more information, click here.

Visit Longhouse Reserve – Come visit Longhouse Reserve Gardens in East Hampton on Wednesdays and Saturdays. For more information, click here.

Birds, Butterflies and Dragonflies tour at NYBG – Saturdays through August 26th, visit New York Botanical Gardens for a colorful tour watching butterflies, birds and dragonflies in their natural habitats. For more information, click here.

Recycle the Rain – Open to North Hempstead Residents ONLY. For more information, click here.

Learn How to Compost – Open to North Hempstead Residents ONLY. For more information, click here.

CHIHULY – Through October 29th, World-Renowed Sculptor Dale Chihuly will be featured in NYBG. For more information, click here.

LI Dahlia Society – Saturday Mornings through November, LI Dahlia Society volunteers will meet at Bayard Cutting Arboretum. For more information, click here.

Smart Garden Exhibit – Through January 2018, visit the smart garden exhibit at BBG. For more information, click here.

Thank you to Long Island Garden Events for the original information. To read more,  click here.

What’s in Bloom, July 7th 2016

There are many flowers blooming in our yard right now. The flowers growing include beautiful Pink Geraniums, yellow and orange Marigolds, Portulaca, Petunia, Small Polka Dot Plant, Coleus, Euphorbia, Hostas, Creeping Jenny, Knockout Rose, Tomato Plant, Rainbow Swiss Chard, White Asiatic Lilies and Day Lilies. All the colors and scents are so amazing. I just love the summer! 

Project Bloom Update 7/5/16

Everything is looking great at our Project Bloom garden at Brookwood Hall. Flowers are blooming everywhere and the vegetable gardens are full of produce. Here’s what’s growing in the Project Bloom Gardens right now! What’s growing includes Strawberries, Brazzle Berries, Basil, Parsley, Rosemary, Shallots, Dill, Nasturtium, Sage, Lavender, Mint, Thyme, Oregano, Chives, Pumpkins, Sugar Baby Watermelons, Sunflowers, Peas, Tomatoes, Beans, Coreopsis, Zinnias, Marigolds, Cosmos, Oakleaf Hydrangea, Cannas, Hosta, Double Pleat Columbine, Dianthus, Delphinium, Dwarf Iris and Coneflower. 

Church Volunteers on July 18th

This past weekend we had many volunteers that came from the Church of Jesus Christ Of Latter Day Saints to volunteer at Project Bloom. They were very helpful, and we loved spending the morning with them! They came with little kids and seniors and we also want to thank our volunteer Bruce who came to help.

Bob built birdhouses out of some scrap lumber and leftover paint. He cut out flowers, bees, butterflies and little birdhouses for the children to paint. It poured with thunder and lightning as soon as they arrived, so we piled into the greenhouse and painted. There were about 3 dozen church members painting, and everything came out so cute and colorful! We are so grateful for their help and they have offered to come back at some point to help again, maybe in September. Keep Islip Clean (KIC) gave us water and granola bars for the volunteers, and also donated cans of paint and brushes for the project.

In the first photo of the stuff piled up on the porch beforehand, you can see two birdhouses made to look like the Islip Train Station and a Barn. They will be mounted in the Kid’s Garden. Bob also built a sign/fence that kids can pose behind that will be installed facing the playground.

Once the rain broke, the church volunteers descended on the weeds in the vegetable garden and did an amazing job. The area along the greenhouse will be planted up as the Stehling Rose Garden. The area behind it, next to the Kid’s Corner has been planted up as a shade garden in honor of Marge O’Connor. We also painted signs for the greenhouse and the garden fence.

What’s In Bloom for Early July

There are many plants blooming in our yard right now. We also had a visit from a woodpecker that flew into our back door, he took some time after impact to collect his bearings on the back steps. The large flowering quince from the corner of the yard was chopped down, it made room for many small plants and now we can see the street from that side of the yard! And we also found a nest in the Dwarf Alberta Spruce in the center of the front yard, there was 5 tiny eggs inside. Some of the plants in bloom are Asiatic Lilies, Black Eyed Susans, Blue eyed Mist and Thyme in the pathway.

What to do in July

Happy July! With an unpredictable month ahead of us, it is time to get down to buisness in the garden. Here are some helpful tips to help you stay on your garden schedule for the month of July!

1. To make sure your potato and tomato plants are protected against late blight, spray with a fungicide containing chlorothalonil (copper if you are growing organic) and reapply weekly. For top notch grass, set mower blades to 3 inches and keep them sharpened to lessen the chance of lawn disease. It is also time to celebrate the Fourth of July! Go America!

2. If you have a pond, add bunches of eelgrass per square foot of the surface water to keep algae under control. It is a good idea to set automatic sprinklers manually to make sure that your lawn gets 1 to 1 1/2 inches of water per week (adjusting for rainfall), Soak deeply in the early morning. When the skins of melons turn yellow, and stems loosen the hold onto the fruit–pick them!

3. Most vegetables planted in the garden need once inch of water per week, while their potted friends dry out much quicker (so check them daily). When the zucchini fruit reaches 5-6 inches long pick it, or the plant will stop producing. For a fall crop it is now the time to sow seeds of lettuce, radish, spinach cabbage, broccoli and cabbage directly into the garden.

4.   Hooray! You can still plant shrubs and trees! Container grown are usually the best (although expensive). If you buy balled or burlapped make sure that the roots are fresh. To prevent powdery mildew , space plants to allow air circulation and avoid wetting leaves, water early in the day. Now is the time to also plant peas again for the fall harvest.

5. Make sure that your tress you newly planted get 1 1/2 inches of water per week, and also water established trees if two weeks have passed without rain. To lure slugs from your garden, place a wooden board inside the garden and overturn it in the morning scraping them off into a pail filled with soapy water.

Thank you Jessica Damiano for the original information. You can read more here.

Helpful Tips:

  • Cut flowers will stay fresher longer if you pick them in the morning, but if you’re going to dry them, pick them late in the day.
  • Living on Long Island it is good to know that if you’re near the beach, spray tree leaves with antidessicant to protect against salt and wind damage.
  • Smokers aware! Cigarettes can transmit tobacco mosaic virus to your plants. Don’t smoke in the garden, and wash hands after smoking before handling plants!